Category: News

Internship Site Spotlight 2019: Trente Dickens

Year 2 scholar Trente Dickens completed his summer 2019 internship at Riverside Veterinary Hospital in Nash County, NC. Trente quickly became the favorite around the office and his supervisor, Melonie Hammack, has agreed to let him stay on for the rest of the summer though his internship has ended.

What do you enjoy most about your internship? I enjoy being able to interact with many different kinds of animals as well as learning to understand the bond they have with their owners and the vet staff.

What is the biggest obstacle you have had to overcome so far in your internship? What tools did you use to overcome it? One of my biggest obstacles was learning to trim black nails. I had an incident where I cut the nail too close, causing it to bleed excessively; however I didn’t let this hinder my confidence and continued to trim nails of sedated pets for practice.

What aspect or element of the Golden LEAF Scholars Leadership Program has been particularly helpful during your internship? I think conflict resolution has been very helpful. There are times when disagreements can come up or someone may have misheard me and I just have to remain calm and kindly come to an agreement.

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Coaches’ Corner: Tracy Pittman

Tracy works as the Director of Operations and Procedures at Wilson Youth United in her hometown of Wilson, NC.

How long have you been a GLSLP coach? 5 years.

What inspired you to become a GLSLP coach?
What inspired me to become a GLSLP coach was to be able to make a positive impact on the young adults in the community. Becoming a GLSLP coach has created a platform to support scholars as they navigate through their academic studies and create an awesome portfolio that they will need throughout their career.

What learning objective or activity utilized at conferences (i.e. DAC, Values Explorer, etc.) do you think is most beneficial to the scholars?
I think the most beneficial learning objective at the conference is the team building activities. The activities help them to identify their strengths and weaknesses so that they may work on those characteristics to become better. It also teaches them how to be team players and reminds them that sometimes it takes a team to accomplish a common goal.

What is something you may have learned at conferences that has been particularly useful in your day-to-day life? One thing that I have learned at the conference is not to take things at face value. There is a whole world out there experiencing the same issues as my community. Learning about other counties and the passion that the scholars have for their counties is heartfelt. It’s good when you can look for something positive in any situation and it gives you hope.

Where do you hope to see the scholars in your coaching group five years from now? I hope to see my scholars graduating with their Masters or Doctorate and living their best life in their career field.

Internship Site Spotlight 2019: Victoria Elledge

Year 2 scholar Victoria Elledge is completing her summer 2019 internship at “I CAN” Pediatric Speech Therapy in Wilkes County, NC. Her supervisor, Haylee Church, says “Victoria has done awesome this whole summer. She has  really stepped up and been really independent. I’m super excited and proud of her! I hope to see her as a speech therapist one day.

What do you enjoy most about your internship? My favorite part of my internship is being able to gain experience working in my dream job and with my ideal demographic. I want to be a Speech Language Pathologist, working with children facing social determinants of health, and that is exactly the demographic I work with and job position I shadow at my internship site.

What is the biggest obstacle you have had to overcome so far in your internship? What tools did you use to overcome it? I had to become accustomed to the work environment at my internship site. I have never worked or shadowed at a therapy clinic, so this was a completely new experience for me. To adjust to my new environment, I relied on my leadership training from the GLSLP and my drive for success.

What aspect or element of the Golden LEAF Scholars Leadership Program has been particularly helpful during your internship? I really rely on my Myers-Brigg Type Indicator (MBTI) and FIRO-B test. My results help me remember my strengths in the workplace and the areas for improvement. It also reminds me that other people are different from me and having varying needs. I think it helps me be the best intern I can be.

How has your internship enhanced your ability to move forward in your field of study? In my internship, I get countless hours of hands-on experience like assisting in speech therapy sessions, writing visit notes, assisting with speech and language with evaluations, developing care plans, and so much more. This is experience has proved to me that I love my intended career and want to keep pursuing this dream.

Which professional-level skill(s) listed by your supervisor has/have proved to be the most challenging to develop? The most difficult professional-level skill to develop is problem-solving for children with special needs or adaptations. It can be difficult to design therapy goals and session topics when children have multiple sensory, communication, occupational, and physical needs.

Internship Site Spotlight 2019: Donielle Totten

Year 2 scholar Donielle Totten is completing his summer 2019 internship at Finch Blueberry Nursery in Nash County, NC. His supervisor, Dan Finch, says “Donielle is an exemplary model of a fine young person to represent the GLSLP. He has the ability to go far.”

What is the biggest obstacle you have had to overcome so far in your internship? What tools did you use to overcome it? The biggest obstacle I have had to overcome is adjusting to the type of work done here and the time it takes to complete each task with a purpose of accomplishment. I have learned to do multiple tasks, such as how to cut and stick crops, and I even managed to build a greenhouse. I really had to adjust and take in as much information as possible.

What aspect or element of the Golden LEAF Scholars Leadership Program has been particularly helpful during your internship? The biggest aspect I have had to use from the leadership program is communication. I have had to communicate effectively in order to get work done and stay on track with everyone else.

Which professional-level skill(s) listed by your supervisor has/have proved to be the most challenging to develop? The collaboration standpoint and responsibility has been the main skill here that I’ve performed most and that is something I expected. It’s important work for a variety of people and you are handed necessary tasks that must be executed properly. That is often done by working alongside coworkers who are useful when you come across an obstacle you may not be able to tackle on your own.

How has your internship enhanced your ability to move forward in your field of study? Working at a blueberry nursery has motivated me to continue on my path of working for the environment and continuing to appreciate what nature and hard work can produce.

Coaches’ Corner: Jamie Warner

A native of Raeford, NC, Jamie works as an agricultural agent at NC Cooperative Extension in Troy, NC.

How long have you been a GLSLP coach? 5 years.

What inspired you to become a GLSLP coach?
I became a Golden LEAF coach because a friend of mine told me how great this program was. I could not wait to be part of a program that supported young people and urged them to work in their “home counties.”

What learning objective or activity utilized at conferences (i.e. DAC, Values Explorer, etc.) do you think is most beneficial to the scholars?
I think the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) tool is probably the most beneficial to the scholars. When you learn your own personality type and learn how to interact with others, you can navigate just about any situation. Scholars continuously tell me how this helped them with their school, work, and home life.

What is something you may have learned at conferences that has been particularly useful in your day-to-day life? I learn more than the scholars do every time I come to a conference. I have really enjoyed learning about the MBTI types, the growth mindset, and more. Being a coach for the GLSLP has made me better at my job. It has made me a better speaker and a better presenter to my community.

Where do you hope to see the scholars in your coaching group five years from now? In five years, I hope that they have graduated from their university/college. I hope they start seeking a job and become employed right away. For those that want to go to grad school, I hope that they get accepted and become the leader that I always knew that they would be.

Coaches’ Corner: Brittany Harris

Originally from Hoke County, NC, Brittany works as an admissions counselor at Bennett College in Greensboro, NC.

How long have you been a GLSLP coach? This is my first year as a coach.

What inspired you to become a GLSLP coach? I was a Golden LEAF scholar and my coach Maril Elliott actually inspired me. She really made a difference in all of our lives.

What learning objective or activity utilized at conferences (i.e. DAC, Values Explorer, etc.) do you think is most beneficial to the scholars? Values Explorer is definitely the most meaningful. It allows them to physically see the things they hold near and dear. It allows them to make decisions about who they are and who they want to be.

What is something you may have learned at conferences that has been particularly useful in your day-to-day life? As I scholar I viewed the DAC model in terms of school only. As an adult in the workforce and dealing with everyday tasks I find that it has helped me shape what it is I want and effectively go get it.

Where do you hope to see the scholars in your coaching group five years from now? I hope to see Gabriel being the best city planner possible while maintaining a good work life balance. Thankfully, he learned at an early age there is more to life than money. I hope to see Emily and Alexia changing the face of healthcare in rural areas and following through with turning their passions into careers. I hope to see Sekret continuing her education because rural NC needs someone who is genuinely passionate about our children and understanding of their upbringing. Ten years from now hopefully they’ll be like my cohort, sharing wedding invitations, job promotions, coaching, family, etc.

Coaches’ Corner: Scott Elliott

Scott works as a supervisory air operations specialist at the Pope Army Airfield in Cumberland County, NC.

How long have you been a GLSLP coach? 6 years.

What inspired you to become a GLSLP coach? I have a diverse background in education, as well as 26 years active duty military and now work in aircrew operations as a civilian employee. I have always made goal setting a priority for myself and others. I enjoy working with young adults and have four grown children of my own. I believe in early leadership training and the impact it has on individuals, organizations, and community.

What learning objective or activity utilized at conferences (i.e. DAC, Values Explorer, etc.) do you think is most beneficial to the scholars?
The DAC model that is presented to year one scholars gives the foundation for leadership in ways that are undeniable. Direction establishes the vision, goal-setting and mission to be accomplished. Alignment provides the clear understanding of responsibilities in an organized manner. Commitment gives the sense of mutual trust and collective work. The three elements are interdependent for effective leadership

What is something you may have learned at conferences that has been particularly useful in your day-to-day life? The Situation, Behavior, Impact (SBI) model is very useful in giving feedback in the workplace. I use it frequently.

Where do you hope to see the scholars in your coaching group five years from now? I fully expect to see them reaching their career goals and making a difference in their communities.

Coaches’ Corner: Gina Hayes

Gina works as a guidance counselor at Davidson County Schools.

How long have you been a GLSLP coach? 3 years.

What inspired you to become a GLSLP coach? My life’s purpose is inspiring positive change in youth. When I found out about GLSLP and their impact on youth, it was a no brainer that I wanted to be a part of this program. Being a coach gives me an opportunity to influence lives across rural North Carolina. I also get to see the results of my impact which does not happen often in my current profession.

What learning objective or activity utilized at conferences (i.e. DAC, Values Explorer, etc.) do you think is most beneficial to the scholars?
I believe scholars figuring out their top five values [Values Explorer] is most beneficial. They inherently think of themselves first, so figuring out their values helps them begin a conversation of how to align everything they do based on these values.

What is something you may have learned at conferences that has been particularly useful in your day-to-day life? Working with the scholars and learning their behaviors and weaknesses has been particularly useful for me. I work with high school students on a daily basis. Understanding what some of these college students lack (which mostly pertains to social and emotional learning) helps me know what I need to focus on with my high school students to better prepare them for their post-secondary plans.

Where do you hope to see the scholars in your coaching group five years from now? I hope to see all of my scholars graduate from college and pursue the next steps they have created throughout the program. I also hope after four years of interning in their rural communities that they find a way to continue to invest in them after graduating college. I know that some scholars may want to explore areas outside of their current community, but I hope they will always view their current county as “home” and find a way to invest their time, talents, and/or money

Coaches’ Corner: L. Montrel Miller

A resident of Southport, Montrel works full-time as the Outreach Director at Brunswick Housing Opportunities in Bolivia, NC.

How long have you been a GLSLP coach? 5 years.

What inspired you to become a GLSLP coach?
I was referred by a colleague that explained the goals of the program. These goals aligned with my philosophy of developing young leaders and empowering them to seek higher education away from home, then returning home to lead. This program gives rural youth a head start in the professional world.

What learning objective or activity utilized at conferences (i.e. DAC, Values Explorer, etc.) do you think is most beneficial to the scholars?
Two of the most beneficial components of the scholars’ training are the Direction, Alignment, Commitment (DAC) leadership model and the re-training of mindsets. Leadership development encourages these youths to have structure and purpose in their duties and presents methods to enhance people to follow them. The mindset model allows for scholars to retrain their thinking in a way that is positive and beneficial versus the proverbial entitled or defeatist mentality.

What is something you may have learned at conferences that has been particularly useful in your day-to-day life? Having a growth mindset has gained relevance in my everyday professional life. It has broken barriers of complacency and helped maintain a positive outlook at the end of my longer days.

Where do you hope to see the scholars in your coaching group five years from now? I hope my scholars enjoy impactful and fulfilling careers. Lucrative jobs are a goal for everyone, but the jobs that benefit the communities they grew up in are the most fulfilling. This allows for those that are like them and people around them to grow upon the success that they have accomplished.

Coaches’ Corner: Christin Brown

A native of Dare county, Christin works for the NC Aquarium as an education curator at Jennette’s Pier in Nags Head.

How long have you been a GLSLP coach? 5 years.

What inspired you to become a GLSLP coach? I am an educator and have worked with students ranging in ages from K to college age for years. I really enjoy that the program allows me to use my skills as an educator but also allows me the opportunity to grow as a coach and a leader. The program has taught me to be a better mentor to interns at my job and has made me a better leader in my department. I continue to coach because I feel that each year I become better and learn from the scholars.

What learning objective or activity utilized at conferences (i.e. DAC, Values Explorer, etc.) do you think is most beneficial to the scholars?I believe the Freshmen year conference where they learn about leading with self is very valuable. Learning about your personality and how you may respond to different situations. Learning about careers that may be best based upon your personality. Also appreciate that students learning that being an introvert does not mean you are afraid or incapable of leading and public speaking. Being an introvert just means you get your energy from your “downtime” not from being surrounded by people. It is also important for scholars to learn how to lead, through direction, alignment and commitment.

What is something you may have learned at conferences that has been particularly useful in your day-to-day life? I love and often share with friends and colleagues that feedback is a gift. It can be delivered in a way that is meant to open us up to our blind side so we can learn from the feedback. Delivering feedback can be short and simple and not involve emotion, state the situation, the behavior and its impact on you.

Where do you hope to see the scholars in your coaching group five years from now? I hope to see Haley working as a second grade teacher at a school in her home county, Austin opening up his own environmental consulting firm, and Adam graduating from PA school and eventually working in a hospital.

Golden LEAF Scholars Leadership Program
Center for Creative Leadership
1 Leadership Pl.
Greensboro, NC 27410

Julie Griffin | Program Director
griffinj@ccl.org
(336) 286-4412 | Fax: (336) 286- 4434

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